FIST LOGIC

THINK IT, SEE IT, BUILD IT, BE IT.

I THINK, THEREFORE, IT BECOMES.

Expert level performance is as much about internal communication as it is about external movement.

I know that this hot on the heels of yesterday’s post but I wanted to address something before I became distracted and forgot about it.

FORMS AS A MEMORY FUNCTION

Something that is not in our face and as such often overlooked is that FORMS are also DRILLS.

We repeat the same set of movements over and again to “GROOVE” that action.

Performing a perfect movement may appear to be a physical thing but in reality all movement is a product of our thinking, an output from our C.P.U.

Our Brain.

Expert level performance is as much about internal communication as it is about external movement.

Think – send the memo – move.

Understanding the movement that we wish to perform is essential if we hold any hope of doing it correctly.

There are great gains to be had when we use our FORMS as a drill to aid and enhance our memory.

When I was quite serious about playing tennis I would spend hours working on just my service action, as a result my serve rarely let me down in matches when the pressure was on.

There is no difference between a body playing tennis and a body doing Kung Fu, or a body fighting.

This may sound a bit like compu-tech babble but better memory equates to higher competancy rates and better completion rates, vital stats in a violent encounter.

PHASE 2 [this is just a wee bit weird].

A deeply important aspect of FORMS training is that we are quite literally building a new person, and building a new universe for that person to operate in complete with new rules and new expectations.

This Universe is the Chum Kiu / Biu Gee Universe, if it helps in any way think of it like the ‘Marvel Universe’ and we are developing a new character to go help save the world.

This is not as ‘OUT THERE’ as it may sound, we have no REAL proof that we exist in this universe.

If we are training our Wing Chun for practical competency in fighting, which is of course the only goal to train for, the end game is to arrive at a predictable, repeatable, powerful, correct position and ‘physical end-state’.

It is all and only about the ‘END GAME’!

Do I hear you ask why?

Because where we begin any action will not be in our control as our action will be a response to an oponents action.

This is called ‘Counter Attacking’, wait a minute, that sounds a lot like Wing Chun.

And as such all of our training is about achieving the desired ‘end state‘ on the fly.

The SHAPE THAT WORKS.

In the place it works best.

As I frequently mention we need to be capable of thinking flexibly, of performing some at times tricky bits of mental gymnastics

It is an absolute ‘No Brainer’ that if we expect our training to work when we are in a perilous environment, then that environment needs to reflect, as much as possible, our training environment.

Most students shy away from even considering this.

But in reality, this is where the rubber meets the road.

MENTAL GYMNASTIC #1.

There is no way on Earth that the environment we find ourselves in will reflect the environment we trained in.

The task becomes being the same person doing the same thing in these diverse environments.

That Marvel Hero, doing marvelous things, in ‘our own’ marvelous universe.

MENTAL GYMNASTIC #2.

“The only way that we can live is if we grow.

The only way we can grow is if we change.

The only way we can change is if we learn.

The only way we can learn is if we are exposed.

And the only way that we are exposed is if we throw ourselves into the open.” — C. Joybell

HOKKA HEY.
WHAT KIND OF DAY IS IT FOR YOU?

FIST LOGIC, VIDEO

CONDITIONING, A CONTINUATION.

Force summation of a rower. (source: sportsmedbiotech, 2009)

Up goes the cry ‘Wing Chun does not use strength”.

Guess what? Conditioning and fitness are not just about strength!

This is a reposting from 18 months ago, but this is a vital piece of the puzzle. Rule #1 if you wish to win a blue, be a better human.

I want to spend a few weeks looking at various types of and approaches to conditioning to make the most of our training, this may sound off-key but there is a great deal more to being effective at Wing Chun than just learning Wing Chun.

Fighting is a physical experience, so surely there needs to be a physical element to the training.

It makes no difference what so ever if we do ‘Internal’ or ‘External’ Wing Chun.  If we depend on ‘Thought Force’ or ‘Physical Force’

If our body is not up to the task of performing as the blunt instrument needed to deliver our force of choice we could be in serious trouble the day we need to use it.

Hands break when they hit faces, this is the real reason Boxers wear gloves.

Talking to certain sections of the Wing Chun community about the need to introduce strength and fitness is as difficult and fruitless as talking to an Australian Liberal politician about the need to phase out coal.

Up goes the cry ‘Wing Chun does not use strength”.

Guess what? Conditioning and fitness are not just about strength!

It is just as much about building mobility to get out of the way, improving our VO2 Max so we do not gas out in 5 seconds or developing the resilience to not fall in a heap if we fail to get out of the way and get hit in the head.

Wing Chun very strangely does not have specialised training regimes such as Chi Kung of other T.C.M.A.

I have no idea why this is, it makes no sense.

But perhaps it does, perhaps we have just stopped identifying them as such, upgraded them to something else, helped of course by the post-war Hong Kong entertainment industry.

If we had not all fallen the romanticised exploitation of Chi Kung and Kung Fu that was perpetrated by the Shaw Brothers beginning in the early 1950s perhaps we would have realised that Chi Kung was a precursor of today’s sports science and maybe, just maybe Kung Fu would not have slipped into obscurity and disregard compared to Modern Combat Sports.

The idea of a genteel scholar defeating thugs was such a breadwinner for the Shaw Studios it was pretty much the theme of every movie, perhaps unintentionally it allowed weak unfit people to think they could compete if they just played Kung Fu.

Many still do.

Many are still wrong.

What conditioning do I think we need?

This is a very difficult question to answer, it all depends on what type of trouble we think we will get into.

I am sure we all think different things.

Do we need to be steady, stable and strong?

Do we need to be mobile, quick and adaptive?

Can we be both?

If we can begin to see all of the Forms as being conditioning exercises, at least at a base level, we are at least starting from a sound base.

By all means, keep seeing them as ways to circulate Chi if that is your approach but first let them be simply physical.

In my last post, I mentioned the ‘Stretch Reflex’ and how in some situations it can have a negative impact on our actions.

That does not mean that the ‘Stretch Reflex’ is always negative, there are many situations where it can be used to our advantage.

Understanding the ‘Stretch Reflex’ and how we condition our body and our thinking to work with it, and of great importance understanding that we cannot influence it in any way.

No matter what some people may say or even claim, we cannot train a reflex. Training is a conscious action, reflexes are unconscious actions.

To think otherwise is to pursue a fantasy.

But once we identify, understand and can predict the effect of a Stretch Reflex we can adapt our training so that it has less of a chance of working against us.

So that we have less of a chance of working against ourselves.

CONDITIONING – STRETCH REFLEX from WC INCa’s on Vimeo.

There are a lot of people that say Wing Chun does not work on account of some very sad YouTube fights, the simple truth is that a hobbyist, a weekend warrior, no matter how skilled or capable will always loose to a full-time combat athlete.

Survival of the fittest is not a cliche, neither in the ring or on the street.

If we wish to do better we must become more athletic, more dynamic, more physical, the whole IDEA behind the do not use strength argument is a misrepresentation, it should be “do not depend on strength”, which really is just another way of saying trust your skill first, however, if your attacker is smaller and weaker there is nothing wrong with using strength, it will work.

The popular sales pitch representation that doing Wing Chun will “level the playing field” against a stronger, bigger, faster, fitter opponent only works if the opponent has no skill, only brute strength.

Being faster, fitter, stronger does not guarantee a win, but it helps.

Get fitter, get stronger, get faster, get conditioned, and of course, keep improving your skill.

Learn how to walk and chew gum.

TRAIN YOUR WEAKNESS, WORK TO YOUR STRENGTH.

WHAT KIND OF DAY IS IT FOR YOU?

FIST LOGIC, VIDEO

CONDITIONING, A CONTINUATION.

Force summation of a rower. (source: sportsmedbiotech, 2009)

Up goes the cry ‘Wing Chun does not use strength”.

Guess what? Conditioning and fitness are not just about strength!

I want to spend a few weeks looking at various types of and approaches to conditioning to make the most of our training, this may sound off-key but there is a great deal more to being effective at Wing Chun than just learning Wing Chun.

Fighting is a physical experience, so surely there needs to be a physical element to the training.

It makes no difference what so ever if we do ‘Internal’ or ‘External’ Wing Chun.  If we depend on ‘Thought Force’ or ‘Physical Force’

If our body is not up to the task of performing as the blunt instrument needed to deliver our force of choice we could be in serious trouble the day we need to use it.

Hands break when they hit faces, this is the real reason Boxers wear gloves.

Talking to certain sections of the Wing Chun community about the need to introduce strength and fitness is as difficult and fruitless as talking to an Australian Liberal politician about the need to phase out coal.

Up goes the cry ‘Wing Chun does not use strength”.

Guess what? Conditioning and fitness are not just about strength!

It is just as much about building mobility to get out of the way, improving our VO2 Max so we do not gas out in 5 seconds or developing the resilience to not fall in a heap if we fail to get out of the way and get hit in the head.

Wing Chun very strangely does not have specialised training regimes such as Chi Kung of other T.C.M.A.

I have no idea why this is, it makes no sense.

But perhaps it does, perhaps we have just stopped identifying them as such, upgraded them to something else, helped of course by the post-war Hong Kong entertainment industry.

If we had not all fallen the romanticised exploitation of Chi Kung and Kung Fu that was perpetrated by the Shaw Brothers beginning in the early 1950s perhaps we would have realised that Chi Kung was a precursor of today’s sports science and maybe, just maybe Kung Fu would not have slipped into obscurity and disregard compared to Modern Combat Sports.

The idea of a genteel scholar defeating thugs was such a breadwinner for the Shaw Studios it was pretty much the theme of every movie, perhaps unintentionally it allowed weak unfit people to think they could compete if they just played Kung Fu.

Many still do.

Many are still wrong.

What conditioning do I think we need?

This is a very difficult question to answer, it all depends on what type of trouble we think we will get into.

I am sure we all think different things.

Do we need to be steady, stable and strong?

Do we need to be mobile, quick and adaptive?

Can we be both?

If we can begin to see all of the Forms as being conditioning exercises, at least at a base level, we are at least starting from a sound base.

By all means, keep seeing them as ways to circulate Chi if that is your approach but first let them be simply physical.

In my last post, I mentioned the ‘Stretch Reflex’ and how in some situations it can have a negative impact on our actions.

That does not mean that the ‘Stretch Reflex’ is always negative, there are many situations where it can be used to our advantage.

Understanding the ‘Stretch Reflex’ and how we condition our body and our thinking to work with it, and of great importance understanding that we cannot influence it in any way.

No matter what some people may say or even claim, we cannot train a reflex. Training is a conscious action, reflexes are unconscious actions.

To think otherwise is to pursue a fantasy.

But once we identify, understand and can predict the effect of a Stretch Reflex we can adapt our training so that it has less of a chance of working against us.

So that we have less of a chance of working against ourselves.

CONDITIONING – STRETCH REFLEX from WC INCa’s on Vimeo.

There are a lot of people that say Wing Chun does not work on account of some very sad YouTube fights, the simple truth is that a hobbyist, a weekend warrior, no matter how skilled or capable will always loose to a full-time combat athlete.

Survival of the fittest is not a cliche, neither in the ring or on the street.

If we wish to do better we must become more athletic, more dynamic, more physical, the whole IDEA behind the do not use strength argument is a misrepresentation, it should be “do not depend on strength”, which really is just another way of saying trust your skill first, however, if your attacker is smaller and weaker there is nothing wrong with using strength, it will work.

The popular sales pitch representation that doing Wing Chun will “level the playing field” against a stronger, bigger, faster, fitter opponent only works if the opponent has no skill, only brute strength.

Being faster, fitter, stronger does not guarantee a win, but it helps.

Get fitter, get stronger, get faster, get conditioned, and of course, keep improving your skill.

Learn how to walk and chew gum.

TRAIN YOUR WEAKNESS, WORK TO YOUR STRENGTH.

WHAT KIND OF DAY IS IT FOR YOU?